Twas the Month Before Christmas….

‘Twas the month before Christmas
When all through the land,
Not a Christian was praying
Nor taking a stand.
Why the PC Police had taken away
The reason for Christmas….No one could say.
The children were told by their schools not to sing,
About shepherds and Wise Men and Angels and things.
It might hurt people’s feelings the teachers would say,
December 25th is just a “Holiday”
Yet shoppers were ready with, cash, cheques and credit
Pushing folks down to the floor just to get it”
CD’s from Madonna, an X BOX, an I-pod
Something was changing, something quite odd!
Retailers promoted cards with cute bears.
No baby in a crib, not even reindeers..
As Targets were hanging their trees upside down.
At Lowe’s the word “Christmas” was nowhere to be found.
At K-Mart and Staples and Penny’s and Sears
You won’t hear the word “Christmas; it won’t touch your ears.
At the top of the Senate, there arose such a clatter.
To eliminate Jesus, in all public matter.
And we spoke not a word, as they took away our faith.
Forbidden to speak of salvation and grace.
The true Gift of Christmas was exchanged and discarded.
The reason for the season, stopped before it started.
So as you celebrate “Winter Break” under your “Dream Tree”,
Sipping your Starbucks, listen to me.
Choose your words carefully choose what you say….
Shout MERRY CHRISTMAS not Happy Holiday!
-author unknown –
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Faith Matters, Inspiration, Just for fun, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to Twas the Month Before Christmas….

  1. Adrienne says:

    Yep — and don’t do business with merchants that won’t say Merry Christmas!

  2. Holly says:

    I expected a little more than this ‘War on Christmas’ stuff from you, Deb.

    You’re not supposed to do Christmas stuff in government schools because there is meant to be separation of church and state. But you know what? I’ve been in many government schools and they sing the religious carols alongside the pro-Santa stuff. I’ve been to more than one school that has a nativity scene (again- government schools). Schools also celebrate Easter.

    Does a store cashier wishing you a happy holiday detract from your enjoyment of Christmas or the spiritual significance it has for you?

    There is no “PC police” stopping anyone from wishing anyone else a happy anything. All there is are corporate executives who recognise that getting people hyped up for Christmas makes them money, but getting people that celebrate all the other holidays- Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Ramadan, Tết, Solstice- means they make money out of everyone.

    If someone wishes me a happy holiday I don’t take that to mean that we are “forbidden to speak of salvation and grace”, it just means that that person doesn’t know my faith and doesn’t presume me to celebrate Christmas by default. I wish them a happy holiday in return because I don’t know them.

  3. Suzanne says:

    For Holly above, let me just say that it is true that for families and people who love Christmas and the reason for it, that really nothing can take that Faith away completely if the teaching and giving and sharing of that great Faith in Christ has been done not only at Christmas time, but all through the year. Still, there are “police” types who do fight to keep something as simple and innocent as a creche up in public place these days…a place that Christians do pay taxes, as well for in America and I’m not sure where else. What is the fear? A little innocent babe to fear?
    A representation of a poor couple who had a baby
    out in the middle of nowhere because noone would give them a warm room or bed? Why is there fear in allowing this scene on public grounds? It is mind boggling trying to figure out what the problem with this scene is for some. That really what this is all about…the fear of one little babe. Hmmmm……

  4. Holly says:

    Exactly which public places are you referring to? I have never heard of anybody complains that they drove past a church or a home and saw a nativity scene out on the grass. If someone complains that the mere sight of the nativity is offensive, then of course I would disagree with that.

    If you are talking about nativity scenes in government buildings then I would oppose that. It has nothing to do with fear, it has to do with establishing a neutral ground. It’s saying that hey this is a council building, and in this building we are not Christians and non-Christians, we are citizens. Barcoded, numbered, generic citizens.

    Fear has no part in it, the nativity gives me nothing but fuzzy happy feelings!

  5. ukok says:

    Holly, it’s something i found on the internet, i didn’t write it. For what its worth, i echo the sentiment of the poem. As far as i know there isn’t even a Walmart or Sears in England, but we did once have our local Mayor trying to turn Christmas into a Christ less Christmas and replacing it with ‘Happy Winterfest’.

    In answer to your question about Cashiers wishing me a happy holiday…thank God that the expession is largely American, i have never heard it over here from anyone.We say ‘Merry Christmas’ or ‘Happy Christmas’.

    If someone said Happy Holiday to me i would say ‘and a Happy Christmas to you to!’ to differentiate that this is more than a ‘holiday’.

    Also, about your comment to Suz, you say you would oppose th nativity scene being put in public buildngs, but would you oppose tinsel being hung up and other decorations that clearly indicate that Christmas is being celebrated, albeit, indirectly?

  6. Holly says:

    I think there are two different ways of looking at Christmas. There is the true Christmas message of the birth of Jesus, and there is the populist Christmas of trees, Santa, presents, tinsel, lights, etc. Even though some of those things have roots in religious symbolism, to many people they no longer have religious connotations. My sister is adamently atheistic, but she loves decorating Christmas trees as much as the next person.

    I would not object to the hanging of tinsel in a government building because I think that now resides in the grey area of the separation of church and state, but if someone claimed it was inherently Christmassy, thus religious, thus a violation of church and state I would have to concede the moral argument to them. Just like school nativity plays: I know that it violates separation of church and state but I have never taken a stand against it. I like the nativity play, even if it does violate ethical boundaries.

    As for “our local Mayor trying to turn Christmas into a Christ less Christmas and replacing it with ‘Happy Winterfest’”. Your mayor doesn’t have the power to take Christ out of Christmas. No one has that power. Unless he was proposing fines to anyone who observed Christmas for its religious significance or wished another person a merry christmas, I don’t see that as an attack on Christmas. Wishing someone a happy holiday is acknowledging that the Western world is multicultural. Wishing someone a happy winterfest is trying to do the same but coming off kind of…dumb.

  7. ukok says:

    “I think there are two different ways of looking at Christmas. There is the true Christmas message of the birth of Jesus, and there is the populist Christmas of trees, Santa, presents, tinsel, lights, etc. Even though some of those things have roots in religious symbolism, to many people they no longer have religious connotations. My sister is adamently atheistic, but she loves decorating Christmas trees as much as the next person.

    For me there is only one way of looking at Christmas. Christ is integral to everything and especially at Christmas. I’ve never heard of anyone putting up a ‘holiday tree’ or buy ‘holiday presents’ for their children. They are Christmas trees, Christmas presents, frankly i find your sisters atheistic kudos questionable if she embraces the Christmas season almost as much as Christians do.

    I would not object to the hanging of tinsel in a government building because I think that now resides in the grey area of the separation of church and state, but if someone claimed it was inherently Christmassy, thus religious, thus a violation of church and state I would have to concede the moral argument to them. Just like school nativity plays: I know that it violates separation of church and state but I have never taken a stand against it. I like the nativity play, even if it does violate ethical boundaries.

    So you would be prepared to argue over tinsel if it became an religious issue, because although you are a Christian yourself, you believe that Church and state should remain separate?

    The nativity play. What ethical boundaries does it violate?

    As for “our local Mayor trying to turn Christmas into a Christ less Christmas and replacing it with ‘Happy Winterfest’”. Your mayor doesn’t have the power to take Christ out of Christmas. No one has that power. Unless he was proposing fines to anyone who observed Christmas for its religious significance or wished another person a merry christmas, I don’t see that as an attack on Christmas. Wishing someone a happy holiday is acknowledging that the Western world is multicultural. Wishing someone a happy winterfest is trying to do the same but coming off kind of…dumb.

    No one has the power to take Christ out of Christmas full stop. But the Mayor does have the ability to publicise city events as Winterfest events and draw a huge amount of attention to the City…events which were previously had the word ‘Christmas’ in their title. I do see it as an attack especially as he happened to be the most contraverial homosexual mayor the city ever had..a mayor who bought the city its first ‘Gay Parade’.

    The city didn’t re-elect him.

  8. Holly says:

    “For me there is only one way of looking at Christmas. Christ is integral to everything and especially at Christmas. I’ve never heard of anyone putting up a ‘holiday tree’ or buy ‘holiday presents’ for their children. They are Christmas trees, Christmas presents, frankly i find your sisters atheistic kudos questionable if she embraces the Christmas season almost as much as Christians do.”

    Maybe England is more overtly spiritual than Australia, but here most people celebrate Christmas as a cultural holiday rather than a religious holiday. Of all the people I know (family, friends, client, colleagues), just about everyone celebrates Christmas with the tree, the presents, the meal with family, the carols. Of all these people, the only ones that go to church on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day are my grandparents, some of my elderly clients, and myself. I don’t really probe people about their religious beliefs (if they have any) but from what I can tell most people I know are not very religious but still celebrate Easter and Christmas. So that is what I mean by two ways of looking at Christmas. It may not be right, but I think it is a reality. Just because someone gives their child a Christmas present on Christmas Day, they are not necessarily thinking to themselves that they are giving the gift to symbolise the gifts given by the Three Wise Men to Jesus and to symbolise God’s gift of Jesus to the world. Many of them are thinking they are giving a gift because it is Christmas and that is what you do. That is the family tradition and the societal tradition.

    I would not object to the hanging of tinsel in a government building because I think that now resides in the grey area of the separation of church and state, but if someone claimed it was inherently Christmassy, thus religious, thus a violation of church and state I would have to concede the moral argument to them. Just like school nativity plays: I know that it violates separation of church and state but I have never taken a stand against it. I like the nativity play, even if it does violate ethical boundaries.

    “So you would be prepared to argue over tinsel if it became an religious issue, because although you are a Christian yourself, you believe that Church and state should remain separate?”
    Well mostly I would stay out of the tinsel argument, but if someone asked my opinion I would have to agree that tinsel is for Christmas and this technically shouldn’t be in government buildings. But you know what? I have friends who are Muslim, Hindu, Jewish, etc, and I have never met anyone of a different faith that really gives a crap about the lights and tinsel and wreaths because these things are not not really promoting a religious message, they are more along the lines of promoting a time of celebration, family and giving.

    And yes, I absolutely believe Church and state should be separate. Nothing scares me more than a theocracy. Have you ever read The Handmaid’s Tale?

    “The nativity play. What ethical boundaries does it violate?”
    In government schools?
    Would you like your kids doing a play about Mohammed?
    Because unless you celebrate all religions in a government school then you are discriminating.

    I think your frustration here is misdirected. You seem to see Western society as fundamentally Christian, therefore anything that doesn’t fit in with that is an attack on the moral majority. Politicians and corporate heads want people to agree with them because it makes them money and keeps them in the top job. They purposefully try not to be controversial but instead try to do what they think people want. These changes are because society is changing and the politicians and corporations want to try to change to fit what they think society wants. Maybe in the case of your mayor they misread the situation and changed too quickly.
    I think you are frustrated because you know all this already. You know we are becoming more multicultural, more diverse in all aspects of life, and that the sacred traditions of the Christian holidays have been repackaged and sold so many times that somewhere along the lines people discarded the religious message and clung to the cultural orgy of pretty decorations and mass gift giving.

  9. mum6kids says:

    I don’t get the idea of Christmas as a ‘cultural holiday’. What culture?
    It’s Christmas-the birth of Christ. It’s a Christian holiday in what was once Christian countries but where everyone can wish Christians a Merry Christmas just as I wish Happy Eid to my muslim friends even though I don’t celebrate Eid.
    Why deny the crib and the symbols. Damn it all – those shops make MONEY out of Christmas and then have the nerve to spit at it.
    And SANTA is NOT a secular symbol he’s a saint. He spent 10 long years in prison for that Christ so many people want expunged from public display.

    And since when did separation of Church and State mean no Christian expression in public places?

  10. Holly says:

    “I don’t get the idea of Christmas as a ‘cultural holiday’. What culture? It’s Christmas-the birth of Christ. It’s a Christian holiday in what was once Christian countries but where everyone can wish Christians a Merry Christmas just as I wish Happy Eid to my muslim friends even though I don’t celebrate Eid.”

    I’m not saying anyone has to agree that it is valid to celebrate Christmas as anything other than a Christian holiday. My argument is not that there are two types of Christmas celebrations and both are equally valid. What I am saying is that there is a high percentage of people that ‘celebrate’ Christmas but don’t give a second thought to the religious message. Are you trying to tell me that you don’t know anyone who does not identify as a Christian who also celebrates Christmas? Australia is much less religious than America (and perhaps the UK but I haven’t seen the figures on that) but everyone I know who does not follow a religion other than Christianity celebrates Christmas. Let’s say I know 100 people. Maybe 5 of those people are Jewish or Muslim or Hindu. Those 5 don’t celebrate Christmas. Of the 95 others, maybe 25 of them consider themselves to be Christian. The other 70 are atheists or agnostics or generically non-religious (that may sound like I high percentage but I am 24 so of my age bracket it is pretty realistic). But all of these 95 celebrate Christmas. They get together with family, decorate a tree, exchange presents. For the 25 Christians, Jesus is central. They might go to church, give religious cards, make charitable donations, set up a nativity scene. The 70 non-Christians do not.

    In wishing people a happy holiday, corporations are focussing their marketing on the 70 non-Christians.

    “Why deny the crib and the symbols. Damn it all – those shops make MONEY out of Christmas and then have the nerve to spit at it.”

    Because they don’t consider it be spitting at anything. If you consider my theoretical 100 friends (which would have different percentages in different countries and among different social circles and age groups, obviously. ) The marketing people think to themselves that they could decorate with the crib and the symbols and a big banner saying “Jesus is the reason for the season” and market to the 25 Christians, but they don’t want to risk pissing off the 70 non-Christian Christmas celebrators and the 5 of other faiths (and yes, the 5% would vary widely based on location. I live in a very whitebread area.). Those 75 people have money too and the corporations want it! So they market to the 70 non-Christian Christmas celebrators because they figure the Christians will still feel included and the non-Christians consider tinsel and Santa to be fairly benign and won’t care.

    And think of it this way: if Christmas is a sacred holiday to you then you are probably less likely to go overboard spending on decorations and gifts, trying to compensate for the lack of belief with a whole load of material things. If you are a devout Christian, you are probably more likely to stick with the nativity scene passed down through the family and make charitable donations instead of thousands of dollars of gifts. For the non-Christian Christmas celebrators they don’t have the significance of the spiritual message. All they have is the consumerism and the overspending. No wonder stores focus on them!

    “And SANTA is NOT a secular symbol he’s a saint. He spent 10 long years in prison for that Christ so many people want expunged from public display.”
    Maybe St Nicholas was, but Santa is a bastardised version of St Nicholas.

    “And since when did separation of Church and State mean no Christian expression in public places?”
    It doesn’t. But it does mean no promotion of religion in goverment buildings. Singing carols in the city park isn’t violating separation of church and state. Putting a nativity scene or a monument to the 10 commandements up in the local council building very much is.

  11. Holly says:

    “And SANTA is NOT a secular symbol he’s a saint. He spent 10 long years in prison for that Christ so many people want expunged from public display.”
    Maybe St Nicholas was, but Santa is a bastardised version of St Nicholas.

    * I should say the modern incarnation is a bastardised version. No disrespect to Saint Nick.

  12. Amen and put CHRIST back in CHRISTmas.

  13. Jim says:

    How sad the length to which some people will go to pray at the altar of “separation of church and state” with yet a breathless lack of knowledge on the subject. If you read Thomas Jefferson’s letters to the Continental Congress, you will learn that his utmost concern was keeping government from interfering with religious faith — NOT keeping religious faith and elements out of government. Freedom of religion was never intended to be freedom from religion. Our founding fathers must be spinning feverishly in their graves.

    Merry Christmas, and God bless you all!

  14. Holly says:

    It is interesting to me that people who don’t advocate for separation of church and state don’t really stop to think about which church could gain government influence. I guess people just assume that either the Catholic or Protestant church will reign surpreme and gays and stem cells will be banned and things will be fine and dandy.

    If we don’t have separation, what if a Jehovah’s Witness gets into power and outlaws blood transfusions?
    If we don’t have separation, what if some backwards fundie gets into power and takes literally some passages of the bible that indicate mixed marriage is unlawful, therefore reinstating anti-miscegenation laws?
    What if Asjkenazi Jews make it illegal to carry out any of the 39 banned activities on Shabbat?

    Don’t assume that religious intanglement in government will automatically be to you liking.

  15. john doe says:

    I am a Christian and I am sick and tired of hearing this lie about separation of church and state. I am also an historian and I challenge anyone to show me where it says separation of church and state in the Constitution or the Declaration of Independence or within the Federalist Papers.

    I am sick and tired of so-called Christians complaining about stores and atheists and liberals persecuting Christians and/or the Christian faith, and then do absolutely nothing.

    I have come to this resolution concerning Christmas. Let’s give these Satanists, humanists, homosexuals, hate-mongers, anti-Americans what they want. That is to say I will never buy anything within our secular economy that is remotely linked to Christmas, Easter, or any other religious event. Instead I will horde my money. I will seek other alternatives to celebrating the religious holidays of Christianity that would prevent any money going into a Godless economy. I will not contribute time, money, etc. to any school, community or health organizations within our secular arena. If enough Christians get enough courage to crawl out from beneath their covers, then these stores that balk at saying Merry Christmas, etc. will think twice. When more and more people of anti-religious hatred begin to lose their employment due to the Christian majority not patronizing their businesses or buying their products, then maybe they will cry a different tune!
    Each year, a letter will be sent to all the local stores, etc. letting them now why they are losing money. Who knows, I might even start a drive to have Christians commit to doing the same thing each year.

    jhndoe

  16. ukok says:

    Sorry not to have responded sooner, but things are hectic here (and i suspect for you too) and have had little time to blog/respond to comments. As and when i get a few minutes i do read through the comments, i just don’t have time at the mo to respond to them all.

    Briefly i would just say…Holly, SANTA is an anagram of SATAN for a reason

    😉

    JohnDoe,

    I still want to give and receive presents. I don’t buy into the commercialism crapola (i mean i believe in its existance and don’t make excessive purchases), but neither would i advocate vetoing shops on the run up to Christmas. It is about balance, i suppose. Letters to shop owners can still be written, but i don’t think one has to be quite so rigid as to refrain from making purchases during the Season of Advent and Christmas, to make their voices heard.

    Interesting thoughts everyone!

    God Bless

  17. Holly says:

    Since I am an English-born, Australian-raised person commenting on an English blog, I am not sure what Thomas Jefferson, the US Constitution, or the Declaration of Independence has to do with anything I have been commenting on.

    I am Australian. We have a constitution that has a passage that has been interpreted to mean separation of church and state. We have this separation. We are better for it.

    Like I said above, anyone who thinks separation of church and state is not important should stop and think about what this would mean to have the practices of a religion imposed upon you by the government.

    I think what is really puzzling me about this discussion is how differently we are viewing different groups of people. Judging by some of the comments here, most of you folks seem to see our Western societies as made up of Christians and anti-Christians. The Christians want a Christ-centred Christmas, and the anti-Christians are trying to deprive them of it and replace it with a Santa-centred Winterfest. (And then I guess they go home and cackle over their misdeeds and celebrate by sacrificing a goat to Beelzebub and having sex with their brothers).

    I have grown up with one foot in the church and the other foot in atheism. I had 5 years in university, I have gay friends, been to a Skeptic’s Society meeting, attended a Universalist Unitarian service. I’ve met lots of different people of many backgrounds. Anti-Christians? I haven’t met a single one. I don’t know anyone who has given any thought to destroying Christianity or said a bad word about it (well, except by sister single made-up blasphemous lyrics to Christmas carols, but I think she was just trying to get a rise out of me).

    There is NO attack of Christmas. Some Christians just say this because they see things changing and feel persecuted. Instead of calling talkback radio shows to complain about the “War on Christmas” and writing angry letters, maybe stop and think about what is really happening. Stores are catering to the majority, which are Christian-lites and Christmas-celebrating Non-Christians (two groups that the “War-on-Christmas” worriers don’t seem to notice, seeing as how they only see Christians and anti-Christians). Take a moment to stop and think about how the majority has shifted from Christians to Christian-lites and Christmas-celebrating Non-Christians.

    How did this shift happen? When did it happen? We need to know the causes if we can hope to change things.

    My theory: The world became a much more messed up place. Families fell apart, injustices occurred, human rights were violated, the rich got richers and the poor were ignored, horrible things were done in the name of God. Instead of Christians rallying on mass to address these problems, they started focusing on petty things like whether or not Target says “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas”. Religion lost the moral superiority and people became disenchanted.

    We have bigger fish to fry, people.

  18. Penny says:

    No, Holly, winterizing Christmas is a symptom of the larger problem which is has always been a problem…marginalizing God, pushing him to the edges….living as though God doesn’t matter.

    And yes, words do matter. We are being forced into thinking PC. The words we speak have power and to take away our ability to use the words which have meant things in the past is equal to forcing people into uniform-think.

    The problems you listed are NOT what the real spiritual problem is. Pope Benedict is constantly teaching about not pushing God to the edges and not relegating religion to the periphery of the public square.

    Religion…the right relationship to God, is what has always mattered. And language, for good or ill, contributes to promoting it or discouraging it. We are in a cycle which prohibits God from being uttered in the public square.

    If you’ve not met any anti-Christians, what world are you living in, pray? Heard of Richard Dawkins? Christopher Hitchens? Philip Pullman? You may not have met them, but there are plenty of people in my acquaintance who think as they do and are quite vocal about it.

    You say that the world is a messed-place. It has always been so since The Fall. Mankind has always needed salvation. Sin is sin. This is where the root of the cultural wars come from….a denial that sin exists because acknowledging sin is judgmental, points to an absolute Truth that demands holiness. Our modern world does not like to talk about sin. We are too happy pursuing what we think is happiness…unrestrained freedom.

  19. Holly says:

    Peggy, I think there is actually some overlap in our views, but we are phrasing them in different ways and coming at them from slightly different perspectives.

    “No, Holly, winterizing Christmas is a symptom of the larger problem which is has always been a problem…marginalizing God, pushing him to the edges….living as though God doesn’t matter.”
    I completely agree, this is what I was trying to get at in my earlier comments. The religious element of Christmas has lost its importance to many people because God and religion have lost their importance to many people.

    “And yes, words do matter. We are being forced into thinking PC. The words we speak have power and to take away our ability to use the words which have meant things in the past is equal to forcing people into uniform-think.”
    I don’t think you can *force* anyone to think PC. You can chastise (or in some extreme cases: fire and/or prosecute) them for saying, writing, or acting in ways that are non-PC, but you can’t control what they think. No one has banned the words “Jesus”, “Christmas”, “nativity”. The laws and policies that prevent teachers and public officials from publically endorsing and imposing religious views are the same laws that protect your rights to talk about your faith with whatever language you choose. I’m a teacher, and I have had small children stand in front of the class and tell their classmates all about how they have been learning about Jesus and how Christmas is his birthday. I don’t shut down these lines of conversation, that isn’t what being PC is all about.

    “The problems you listed are NOT what the real spiritual problem is. Pope Benedict is constantly teaching about not pushing God to the edges and not relegating religion to the periphery of the public square.”
    I think this is something that we are approaching from very different angles. I assume your idea of having religion in “the public square” in the example of Christmas would be a giant Christmas tree and a beautiful nativity scene set up in the town hall, as if not having these things would somehow make people forget their own beliefs. In my understanding (and I am very much trying to understand how everyone is seeing this issue), people are afraid that the visual representations of the true meaning of Christmas encourage a proper and meaningful celebration of Christmas, therefore removal of these things is damaging to Christmas itself. I see things in the opposite way: everything is internal. The spirit and the faith is inside you and no one can detract from that. You decorate your home in keeping with your beliefs, and you express yourself to others in keeping with your beliefs. Therefore, in my eyes, changing depictions of Christmas is because people are holding different beliefs about Christmas.

    So in my mind, religion is still in the public square if the people in the public square are religious.

    “Religion…the right relationship to God, is what has always mattered. And language, for good or ill, contributes to promoting it or discouraging it. We are in a cycle which prohibits God from being uttered in the public square.”
    I am sure there is absolutely nothing I can say that would shatter your faith (nor would I want to). There is freedom of speech, and you can go and stand in your public square and start reading aloud from Leviticus if you so desired. But there is a huge difference between you standing on a street corner asking passers-by if they are walking with God and handing out poorly-photocopied pamphlets, and me, a public school teacher, announcing to my class that little Jimmy is the only one of them going to heaven because his parents are raising him to be a good Catholic boy but the rest of the little heathens need to go home and tell their parents to take them to confession, especially little Fatima and little Abhijet.

    “If you’ve not met any anti-Christians, what world are you living in, pray? Heard of Richard Dawkins? Christopher Hitchens? Philip Pullman? You may not have met them, but there are plenty of people in my acquaintance who think as they do and are quite vocal about it.”
    You must know some obnoxious people then. Of course I have heard of the people mentioned, just as I have heard of the Westboro Baptists. Two ends of the same spectrum.
    Of course extremists at both ends exist in the world, but I certainly don’t know any. I think most of the world is made up of people with private religious views, and private atheistic views. I don’t think there are enough extremists of either persuasion to really effect the tone of society.

    “You say that the world is a messed-place. It has always been so since The Fall. Mankind has always needed salvation. Sin is sin. This is where the root of the cultural wars come from….a denial that sin exists because acknowledging sin is judgmental, points to an absolute Truth that demands holiness. Our modern world does not like to talk about sin. We are too happy pursuing what we think is happiness…unrestrained freedom.”

    Sure, there has always been wars. People have always done horrible things to each other. But I think the big difference in modern times is the complete breakdown of the family.
    Our parents are our models of God. The unconditional love of parents makes the idea of an all-loving God seem possible. Our parents teach us we are lovable.

    So what happens if your parents are divorced and your father can barely be bothered to see you even once a month? Or your mother is an alcoholic and only serves her own needs? Or your parents both work 12 hours a day and you grow up in daycare feeling like the pursuit of a holiday house or a fancier car was more important than spending time with you?

    Most commonly (in my eyes), the problem with families today is the disconnection in which the emotional needs of a child are not met. The implicit pact you make with your child when you choose to have them is that you will understand for him what he can’t understand himself, and you will provide for his needs that he can’t explain or express. It is almost too painful to actually say, I need this or I need that and face the possibility of explicitly being denied, so things go unsaid and the gulf just gets wider.

    If you don’t feel loved you can’t love. If you can’t love you can’t trust. And if you can’t trust, how can you believe in God?

  20. ticktock says:

    Athesits, agnostics, humantists, and people of non Christian faiths cannot destroy Christmas…large sections of the aforementioned get involved in Christmas – for reasons of cultural cohesion, pure humanitarianism, hedonism, or whatever – if anyone destroyed Christmas….it was Christians….how is it that amongst my Muslim, Jewish, Buddist, Hindu, Athesitic, Jedi, etc friends….we all celebrate what there is to celebrate about each others’ faith, culture and religion…my Muslim friends who wear the Burkhas…the others who have a sneaky bacon sandwich and the odd bottle of beer….we all come from different types of families, from different cultures and traditions….there are certain things we have in common…it might be gender, it might be geography, it might be theology…..but we all know, what we really have in common, is that we are all from the species…when it comes to emotions and values….as different as we may seem on the surface….in truth…you couldn’t slide a piece of paper between us. Even those who seem to oppose us, who seem to distance themselves from us (on grounds of race, religion, colour, ethnicity, yadda, yadda, yadda….you get my drift)….we can’t but help to see the similiarities. Perhaps, forsaking Socrates (only momentarily), we should say, in the words of the great philosopher, Mr W Connolly…..”everywhere you go is just another place where people live”…….don’t tolerate intolerance in others, and don’t tolerate it in yourself. Don’t pretend you are persecuted….you are not.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s