Simple Living – Sensational Scones in minutes

I think i mentioned when i started this year of living simply, that there would be recipes to follow on the blog, that tied in with the theme of simplicity. And oh boy are there some recipes. But though they may be ‘simple’ it certainly doesn’t mean they have to be bland, not at all, and well, you know how one of things i love to do is to bake!

Well one of the easiest, yet tastiest things i like to bake are scones. They can be made sweet or savoury, but require only a few ingredients, a little time, and a hungry stomach to enjoy. I tend to multiply the ingredients by four or five and then freeze batches of them in freezer bags – they do freeze very well indeed.

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Here is the recipe that i used to make rich sultana scones…they are a big hit with my family and are best enjoyed with butter and jam or fresh cream and jam.

The Best Fool-Proof Scone Recipe Ever! (Makes 8-10 scones)

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces of Self-Raising Flour
  • 2 ounces of butter or margarine
  • 1 ounce of sugar
  • 1 medium egg
  • 1 quarter of a pint of milk or cream
  • 2 ounces of sultanas, weighed and then soaked until softened, in enough hot water to cover them
  • a pinch of salt

Method

  • Heat the oven to 220 degrees or gas mark 7.
  • In a bowl, mix the flour, sugar and salt.
  • With your hands, rub the butter/margarine into the dry mixture.
  • Add the softened sultanas to the mixture.
  • In a small bowl, break the egg into the milk and whisk lightly.
  • Add the whisked milk and egg to the mixture and stir until a stiff dough is formed.
  • Try to be gentle…the lighter you treat the mixture, the lighter the finished product will be.
  • Place your dough on a floured surface  and with a floured rolling pin, roll out your dough to a thickness of at least 1/2 or 3/4 of an inch.
  • Now it is time to cut out the rounds. You can use any cutter for the job, personally i prefer to use a tall glass beaker with a diameter of about  2 and a 1/2 inches – because everything is floury the mixture never sticks to the glass and always releases the rounds very easily.
  • When all your rounds are cut, place them onto a baking sheet. I use a silicone sheet or baking paper, but alternatively you can use a greased baking tray.
  • Now with a pastry brush or a digit,  brush a little milk/egg on to the tops of the scone dough.
  • Place the rounds in a preheated oven for approximately 15 minutes until golden in colour, or as the images shown here.

Enjoy!

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16 Responses to Simple Living – Sensational Scones in minutes

  1. Sarah says:

    I love scones! I was looking at an online catalogue for Williams-Sonoma and they have scone pans . . . or wait! it was possibly King Arthur’s Flour company . . . either way, both cooking ware stores . . . When I was in high school, we learned to bake scones. We piled the dough on a baking sheet, made it into a circle about 3 inches thick, cut into triangles (like a pizza) . . . spreading the pieces away from each other a bit . . . yum. Using the bottom of a tin or glass or biscuit cutters work, too. Maybe all these things on scones means I should whip some up!

  2. Cathy says:

    Oh my goodness…will have to try this! Do you think cranberries would work in this?

  3. ukok says:

    Sarah, definately you should make some, i’m sure your family with thank you for it!

    Cathy, i think cranberries would work just fine, depending how tart they are you might want to add a little more sugar, but it would work fine, i’m sure. Go for it – and let me know how they turn out!

  4. OK, for your American fans–do you WEIGH the flour and sugar?

    Those look delicious!

  5. ukok says:

    Oh Barb, i’m so thoughtless! Yes sweetheart, i weigh the flour, sorry i don’t know what the cup equivalent would be 😦

  6. Mimi says:

    Those are so cute! Yum!

  7. they look scrumptious! i think i’ll try currants.

    I just use a kitchen scale when I use european recipes. It’s easy and makes the recipe precise.

    There are conversion sites on the net, though. The baking temp would be 425°F, though.

  8. http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml

    This one will help out a lot of people. Me being one of them, because I want to try those scones!

    It’s just under two cups of flour..
    just under one quarter of a cup of butter
    Just over two tablespoons of sugar
    1 medium egg
    half a cup of milk
    slightly over 1/3 of a cup of raisins, soaked
    pinch of salt

  9. Suzanne says:

    What’s a sultana? Boy! They look good. I like cranberries…so maybe I’ll do what someone else suggested when I make mine …. someday!
    Have you got a recipe with an orange icing? They have some at Panera Bread here and they are yummy!
    Thanks for sharing!
    Mwah!

  10. ukok says:

    Suz, i’m sure this is more information than you really wanted to know but here goes. LOL

    “RAISIN.Noun(1)(a) the dried grape. History C13: From old French :grape, ultimately from the Latin “racemus” cluster of grapes. SULTANA. Noun 1, a dried fruit of a small white seedless grape,originally produced in SW Asia: used in cakes, curries etc.;seedless raisin. (b) the grape itself.(2)Also called:SULTANESS. a wife,concubine, or female relative to the SULTAN.(3) a mistress;concubine. HISTORY C16: from Italian, feminine of sultano SULTAN. CURRANT Noun (1) a small dried seedless grape of the Mediteranean region, used in cooking. (2) any of several mainly N temperate shrubs of the genus RIBES, esp R.rubun (redcurrant) and RR.nigrum (blackcurrant): family GROSSULRIACEAE.(also Gooseberry variant).(3) the small acid fruit of any of these plants. HISTORY C16: shortened from RAYSON OF CORANNTE raisin of Corinth “

  11. ukok says:

    Become What you are and Eva, many thanks for your conversions, i will try to include a conversion chart in future recipes!

  12. Suzanne says:

    Thank you! Not too much..very interesting news for me. 😉

  13. Eva, thanks for the conversion link.

    Deb, no need to “Americanize” your recipes. I can use my kitchen scale and/or the chart Eva linked to and figure it out. I appreciate that you post them.

  14. ukok says:

    Thanks Barb! Hope you are having an enjoyable weekend 🙂

  15. OK, I’m back to tell you that those scones are just as delicious as they look! Thank you again for the great recipe.

  16. ukok says:

    Oh Barb i am SO pleased hey worked out well. I would have felt just awful if they had been yucky LOL!

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